Archive for the Category ◊ Workplace ◊

• Monday, January 13th, 2014

NEWS FLASH: We have a new blog home page!

We are still Ask The Strategist, only now, the site is autonomously run by the Publisher/Editor, Kesi Stribling.

“The decision to move Ask The Strategist from the direct affiliation with KSG Strategic Consulting enables us to reach a wider audience, many of whom are current fans and followers of our media brands outside of KSG,” says Stribling.

The newly refurbished Ask The Strategist will continue to feature posts on business, entrepreneurship, careers, and women, however, one of the additional benefits is a group of new guest bloggers, who will provide content on a number of industries and specialties, including diversity and nutrition.

Our first guest blogger, Delise, is a college student who will share her experiences navigating her internship and school during her semester-long stay in South Africa, beginning in February 2014. Her video blog will be housed under the new section on careers for college students.

What does this mean for you, our subscribers?

All subscribers on the current Ask The Strategist blog (www.ksgsc.com/AskTheStrategist) will be sent a link and instructions for subscribing to/following the new site for Ask The Strategist (http://askthestrategist.wordpress.com). Support is available to answer any questions, or resolve difficulties signing up for the new blog, although a smooth transition for subscribers is anticipated.

Follow the new Ask The Strategist Blog now

Read our first post on the new site:
Ready, Set, Compete: American Express OPEN Forum Shares Tips  to Maximize 2014
http://askthestrategist.wordpress.com/2014/01/10/ready-set-compete-2014

NOTE: We are still in the process of migrating most content over to the new site. Until we have completed this process, archived blog posts may be retrieved from the former blog website. The site will be discontinued and inaccessible once this process is finished with, or without, advanced notice.

Thank you for your support, subscription, and reading our posts since Ask The Strategist debuted in 2011. We look forward to your continued interest and feedback.

Sincerely,

ASK THE STRATEGST Blog Team
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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

1. I am a current subscriber to Ask The Strategist. Will I be automatically added to the new site?

Because subscribers have to opt-in to receive blog posts, we ask that you visit our new home page, enter your email, and click “subscribe.” You will receive an email asking you to confirm your subscription. Once you do, you will begin receiving new blog posts from Ask The Strategist.

>>> Click here to subscribe now

2. Will I still receive blog post notifications from Ask The Strategist?

If you opt to continue your subscription on our new site, your blog notifications will not be interrupted. Once you have subscribed to the new blog, we will terminate your subscription on the old site.

You will also receive one final notification from us if you have not subscribed to the new blog by January 31, 2014.

3. How long do I have before I have to switch to the new site?

We are still migrating pertinent content over to the new Ask The Strategist blog site. You are strongly encouraged to activate your subscription to the new site as soon as possible.

The site will be shut down once we have completed migrating posts over to the new Ask The Strategist home page. So, don’t delay!

4. Will Ask The Strategist share my information with sponsors and advertisers?

No, Ask The Strategist will never share your contact information with our advertisers and sponsors.

5. I would like be a guest logger on Ask The Strategist. Whom should I contact?

While we have most of our guest bloggers for 2014, if you have demonstrated writing experience on issues that would be a good fit for the blog (i.e. entrepreneurship, careers, health, community, diversity, current events, youth, and women), please contact us. Be sure to include links to your blog or writing samples.

 

DISCLAIMER: ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that highlights information on business, entrepreneurship, careers and the workplace, health, community,
and women. Any content or advice dispensed through Ask The Strategist is solely for informational and entertainment purposes. Never miss ASK THE STRATEGIST
blog posts! Have them delivered to your inbox by subscribing.

• Monday, December 09th, 2013

Staying productive while snowed-in

You can stay productive while snowed-in today!

Many of us along the Eastern seaboard are stuck inside after a brutal snowfall over the weekend, resulting in slick streets, icy roads, and general weather yuckiness. Sure, we would like to go out and make snow angels with the kids, or catch up on some guilty pleasure TV (cue the Housewives of whatever city), but the truth of the matter is that we still have to work.

So, here are five tips to keep you focused and productive while you are stuck indoors working.

Play first, then work

If you are like me, snow is actually a welcomed friend that I’m happy to see. So, to shake off the excitability and get focused, allow yourself time to revel at the winter wonderland for a few moments, including calling your loved ones to commiserate, and then get your workspace ready and operational. Having satisfied the kid inside of you before getting to work, you can reduce the urge to stray away from work.

Prioritize your day

You probably prioritize work responsibilities anyway, so tweak your agenda to include unanticipated interruptions, scheduling a play date for the kids because school is closed, shoveling the sidewalk, impromptu office teleconferences, and altered project due dates. If you are the most productive early in the morning, work on the most complicated tasks, or the assignments that take the most time to complete, at the beginning of the day.

Give yourself a break

For some people, working solo at home means that they can work nonstop with little interruption. That means progress, right? Sometimes, it can lead to burnout, brain freeze and frustration. So, schedule brief reprieves during your home-day workday. Take a coffee or tea break, make sure you have a bite to eat for lunch, and give those fast fingers a break from your smartphone, tablet, or laptop.

Stay connected

Staying connected with co-workers and team members while working from home during bad weather creates camaraderie, and keeps you on task. Checking in also helps you stay in touch on project updates, gain management input, and inspire collaboration through trading ideas in a more relaxed environment (your home!) and one-on-one conversations that may not happen during a normal day at work.

In addition, if snowy weather gets you down, staying connected to co-workers can help ease the effects of cabin fever.

Establish a routine and stick with it

Discipline can be tough in the best of circumstances. Staying on task when working alone at home can test your resolve, so it is a good idea to establish a work routine – especially if you anticipate being at home for more than one day – to help you keep on track with expectations from your supervisor, client, and colleagues on your project team.

Do you have any tips that help you productive during a wild weather shut-in? Share in the comment section below, or Tweet us @CareerConnectDC using hashtag #CCSnowDay.

DISCLAIMER: ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that highlights information on business, entrepreneurship, careers and the workplace, health, community, and women’s issues. Any content or advice dispensed through Ask The Strategist is solely for informational and entertainment purposes. All content is the property of Ask The Strategist and affiliated companies unless otherwise noted. We occasionally address questions from our readers and subscribers in posts. Send your question or conundrum  via video or regular email to ask@ksgsc.com. All submissions become the property of Ask The Strategist. Names and other identifying information may be changed to protect the person asking for advice.

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• Friday, December 06th, 2013
Sneak Peek: Super Soul Sunday with Oprah Winfrey and Howard Schultz

Ask The Strategist has been given an exclusive preview of Oprah  Winfrey’s interview with Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz on Super Soul Sunday, which airs this Sunday, December 8, 2013 at 11 a.m. ET on OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network. Winfrey sits down with Schultz, who shares the story of his inspiring rise from the housing projects in Brooklyn, New York, to his current role as a successful entrepreneur, global thought leader, and innovator.

Schultz will share the leadership lessons he’s learned while guiding this iconic brand for more than three decades, discussing how an emphasis on ethics, authenticity and a people-before-profit philosophy helped to grow and sustain his multi-billion dollar company.

Reflecting on his #1 New York Times bestseller, “Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life Without Losing Its Soul,” Schultz recounts the story behind the global coffee company’s comeback in 2008, when he decided to return as the CEO to help restore Starbucks’ core values and mission to inspire and nurture the human spirit – “one person, one cup, and one neighborhood at a time.”

 

Oprah Winfrey with Howard Schultz. Photo Credit © Harpo Studios, Inc./George Burns

Following are three excerpts and video clips of Oprah Winfrey’s interview with Howard Schultz on Super Soul Sunday on OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network.

EXCERPT: One of Howard’s Principles: “Don’t Be Threatened By People Smarter Than You”

OPRAH: And I know that you’re guided by your own values and your own set of principles.  There are four that you talk about that I love: Don’t be threatened by people smarter than you. Can you speak to that?

HOWARD: You can’t build any kind of organization if you’re not gonna surround yourself with people who have experience and skill base beyond your own.  Only as if those people have like-minded values.

OPRAH: That is the key to starting anything.

HOWARD: That’s the key.  And I think when you discover perhaps that these people do not have those values, then you have to have a very quick conversation.  And if they don’t demonstrate that kind of behavior, not everyone deserves to be on the team.

OPRAH: Compromise anything but your core values.  That’s what you say.

HOWARD: Short-term success is not going to build long-term value for anyone.  And we live in an age where everything is based on the short term.  And I think what we’re trying to do and what we’ve demonstrated is very –

OPRAH: You had to fight that in your own culture.

HOWARD: We did.

OPRAH: Yeah.

HOWARD: It’s hard to do.

View the video: “Don’t Be Threatened by People Smarter Than You”

EXCERPT: Howard on the Importance of a Leader to be Vulnerable

OPRAH: You say it’s important as a leader –

HOWARD: To be vulnerable.

OPRAH: — to be vulnerable. Where’d you learn that?

HOWARD: Well, when I stood up in front of people and I — I apologized and started crying that first week.

OPRAH: Which is not what CEO’s do.

HOWARD: Especially men. I think we’re taught as men to — you know, but I think vulnerability is transparency.  And what I said earlier is I think the currency of leadership is transparency and you’ve got to be truthful. So I don’t think it’s — I don’t think you should be vulnerable every day.

OPRAH: Right.

HOWARD: But there are moments where you’ve got to share your soul and your conscience with people and show them who you are and not be afraid of it.

View the video: The Importance of a Leader to be Vulnerable

EXCERPT:  Howard finding Starbucks at a “Spiritual Crisis” Upon His Return to the Company in 2008

OPRAH: Would you say that Starbucks was in a spiritual crisis?

HOWARD: Yes, I would.

OPRAH: Mm-hmm.

HOWARD: And I would say that — I would also say that most of the problems we had were self-induced mistakes.  And I stood in front of the entire employee base of the company, our partners, and said — apologized for, as leaders, that we had let them and their families down.  But we were gonna return the company back to its glory days.

OPRAH: Okay.  So in those days where you knew the company — the company had lost its way –

HOWARD: Yes.

OPRAH: – was in its own spiritual crisis, did you debate whether or not you should jump back in or not?  I know — I know –

HOWARD: First of all, I never planned to come back to Starbucks.  But, again, this is about love.

OPRAH: Because you’d stepped down at CEO.

HOWARD: I did.  This is about love.  This is about passion.  This is about responsibility.  And it’s about leadership.  And there was no second thought whatsoever.  I came back to lead the company back.  But I also needed help from others. And I needed people to believe.  And we started doing things that were quite unorthodox, uncharacteristic of a company that was in trouble, especially during the financial crisis.

View the video: Starbucks Spiritual Crisis

Find OWN in your area

For more information about Super Soul Saturday, visit:

http://www.oprah.com/own-super-soul-sunday/super-soul-sunday.html

DISCLAIMER: ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that highlights information on business, entrepreneurship, careers and the workplace, health, community, and women’s issues. Any content or advice dispensed through Ask The Strategist is solely for informational and entertainment purposes. All content is the property of Ask The Strategist and affiliated companies unless otherwise noted. We occasionally address questions from our readers and subscribers in posts. Send your question or conundrum  via video or regular email to ask@ksgsc.com. All submissions become the property of Ask The Strategist. Names and other identifying information may be changed to protect the person asking for advice.

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• Monday, January 14th, 2013
The New Face of Diversity: President and CEO of the American Conference on Diversity, Elizabeth Williams-Riley, joins us on The Strategy Sessions radio show on Tuesday, January 15, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. ET.

November’s election included sweeping legislative changes for many states, including the DREAM Act and same-sex marriage. In America, diversity has long been a discussion topic at work; however, it has taken on new meaning as social issues, including immigration and advocacy for women. Our guest, Elizabeth Williams-Riley, President and CEO of the American Conference on Diversity, joins us on The Strategy Sessions radio show to highlight how the conversation on diversity is re-shaping the workplace and communities.

Elizabeth Williams-Riley

 

TOPICS COVERED:

  • How the definition of diversity has changed as legislative and societal changes have evolved
  • The impact November’s election will have on the workplace and the community, including states’ support of Same-Sex Marriage and the DREAM Act
  • The relevance of diversity training as women and people of color make strides in the workplace
  • How diversity impacts youth – bullying, leadership, and education
  • American Conference on Diversity programming to raise awareness, train, and prepare tomorrow’s leaders

Listen LIVE: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thestrategysessions

Have a question or comment for our guest?

Call (347) 539-5143

Email talkback@ksgsc.com

Tweet us @KesiStribling

For more information about Elizabeth Williams-Riley, or to view her bio, visit www.ksgsc.com/thestrategysessions.

 

ABOUT THE STRATEGY SESSIONS

Listen live

A radio show featuring industry leaders who share tips and strategies on business, careers, travel, health, and more, The Strategy Sessions airs live on the first and third Tuesdays of the month at 11:00 a.m. ET. The show has featured luminaries representing corporations, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations such as the U.S. Small Business Administration; Internships.com; AAA; American Express; Women Impacting Public Policy; LifeLock; Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship; Aetna; the American Heart Association; and, Lockheed Martin. For more information, or to download the podcast, visit www.blogtalkradio.com/thestrategysessions. Twitter hashtag #TheStrategySessions

 

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• Tuesday, August 28th, 2012

 

Workplace Primer for College Students (part II)

In part I of the Workplace Primer for College Students, we detailed the importance of tailoring the job search and preparing a flawless cover letter or resume. Part II focuses on the interview, specifically what collegiate job seekers should do before, during, and after the meeting with prospective employers.

Prepare for the interview

You're hired! Interview preparation can score big points for your career.

Your cover letter and resume have passed muster and the company you eagerly want to work for has contacted you for an interview. There are several tips to help you prepare for the face-to-face meeting (or telephone screening, as is the trend these days). From selecting an appropriate wardrobe to asking a potential employer the right questions, interview preparation requires a lot of thought – and action.

Look the part: It is essential to select appropriate attire for the interview; and, the accessories that make the outfit, which complete your overall appearance. Ultimately, the interview wardrobe should be professional, and make you blend in, rather than stand out, from the company employees. The reality is that companies want new employees who reflect the current corporate culture, and that includes attire.

Men should wear slacks, a crisp shirt, and matching blazer. Of course, the tie completes the look – not a clip on! Freshly shined shoes and simple accoutrements, such as a watch, sans bling, and conservative cuff links complete the professional look. Interviewees can look stylish, no matter the budget constraints.

Related: professional attire for men

Women do not have to sacrifice style when preparing for the interview.  A modest length and well-fitting (not too tight) skirt or dress is appropriate, with a conservative shirt and blazer. If suiting seems a bit boring, or if the industry has a more relaxed approach to dressing in the workplace, it is okay to pair trousers or a skirt with a cardigan set. Moderate heels or sling backs should be clean and not scuffed. Understated jewelry rounds out the interview outfit.

Related: professional attire for women

Even if the industry usually calls for khakis in the workplace (think technology), you can wear the corporate style once you land the job. For your interview, avoid the casual Friday look.

Women's professional attire on our pinterest page

Research the audience: Knowing one’s audience is imperative. Conduct research about the company in advance, including reviewing the corporate website, Facebook fan page, and Twitter account. Being armed with information about the company helps during the interview. Potential employers will appreciate the initiative, and will view the well-informed candidate as one who possesses a can-do attitude.

Before the interview, practice responses to potential questions that may be asked. Ask a trusted mentor, friend, or family member to conduct a mock interview, and assess your performance. Pay particular attention to the use of fillers when responding to questions  (um, ah, and you know), so that you can avoid them. Record the mock interview, and look at it a few times to improve your delivery. Doing so will help nervous candidates  ace the interview by being ready to talk about tasks undertaken in the current job, or skill sets and special talents that can translate to the job being applied for at the company.

Arrive early for the interview: One of the most important aspects of the interview is arriving on time to the meeting. Even if you’re familiar with the geographic area of the company, identify a preferred and alternate route to get to the interview. If there is an accident, detour, or water main break, taking an alternate route may be the difference between getting to the interview on time, or missing out on the opportunity by being an hour late. Drive to the location, if possible, the same day of the week and time the interview is scheduled, beforehand.

Professional attire for men on our pinterest page

Arrive early (not more than 30 minutes ahead of time), or on time, but never late. Companies often ask candidates to complete applications prior to the interview. Remember, the interview actually begins as soon as you arrive at the location. Be pleasant when speaking to or interacting with anyone in the office. Do not be haughty, put off, overly friendly, or flirt with the staff. By the way, waiting patiently until called in for the interview means no texting, listening to your iPod, or talking on your cell phone with or without your Bluetooth.

Ask the right questions: Be sure to ask at least one question during the interview. It should be one that is of genuine interest and not something that the interviewer has already covered. After the meeting is over, send a thank you note. Conventional thought is that a handwritten note to the interviewer is the way to go, it is also okay to send a brief, error free email thank you note.

Once the company has offered you the job, there are a number of questions to ask, not just those related to salary. Detailed questions include those related to annual and sick leave, retirement contributions by the employer, corporate culture, employee expectations, and other details about the position that may not have come up during the interview (i.e. the position’s funding is contingent upon grant money received).

 

Next: Part III (final) of the Workplace Primer for College Students

© Copyright 2012 Ask The Strategist™

 

DISCLAIMER: ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that addresses business, career, workplace and etiquette issues. Any advice dispensed by Ask The Strategist is purely for informational and entertainment purposes. Take the advice and opinions at your own risk – and betterment! Follow @KesiStribling or @CareerConnectDC on Twitter. Post your questions/email your conundrum/send your question via video to ask@ksgsc.com. All submissions become the property of Ask The Strategist. Names and other identifying information may be changed to protect the person asking for advice.

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• Wednesday, August 22nd, 2012

 

What successful people do with the first hour of their workday

How do you begin your day?

ASK THE STRATEGIST: When people conjure up images of successful business moguls, we often envision them waking up in the morning, reaching across a sleeping spouse to check their iPhones, and thus, the power plays begin. Kevin Purdy, blogger for Lifecompany, says that truly successful people take a moment to be reflective, and that surely does not include compulsively checking email first thing in the morning.

 

What successful people do with the first hour of their workday

by Kevin Purdy – Lifecompany – August 22, 2012

How much does the first hour of every day matter? As it turns out, a lot. It can be the hour you see everything clearly, get one real thing done, and focus on the human side of work rather than your task list. Read the entire post>> >

 

Talk back to us: How do you start your day? Tell us in the comments section below.

© Copyright 2012 Ask The Strategist™

 

DISCLAIMER: ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that addresses business, career, workplace and etiquette issues. Any advice dispensed by Ask The Strategist is purely for informational and entertainment purposes. Take the advice and opinions at your own risk – and betterment! Follow @KesiStribling or @CareerConnectDC on Twitter. Post your questions/email your conundrum/send your question via video to ask@ksgsc.com. All submissions become the property of Ask The Strategist. Names and other identifying information may be changed to protect the person asking for advice.

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• Sunday, August 12th, 2012

 

Workplace Primer for College Students (Part I of III)

Begin your career the right way!

This week, thousands of students will enter the hallowed halls of colleges across the country. For many, once the excitement of moving into dorms and registering for the requisite classes has subsided, collegians will settle into pursuing job opportunities. Whether a necessity, or a means for generating work experience for their resumes, entering the workforce – from searching for jobs to the on-boarding experience – can be a daunting task for rookie employees.

For college students, there are some key imperatives to help them become successful job seekers:  streamline the job search; create a flawless cover letter and resume; prepare for the interview; ask the right questions before you accept the position; give an award-winning performance at work; and, treasure your mentors and advocates.

 

 

Streamline the job search

Applying for any-old-job is a strategy that can lead to a disappointing workplace experience. Streamlining the job search is the first step in gaining temporary or long-term employment. Job seekers typically visit online job sites first to find opportunities. In addition to surfing popular sites, such as DCJobs.com or Career Builder, there are a number of websites tailored to specific industries. For example, CareerMD is an online career source for physicians and residents looking for jobs in the health care industry. The American Marketing Association job site lists thousands of opportunities in marketing and communications. Another site, the American Institute of Architects, lists architecture opportunities spanning internships to project managers.

Paid jobs, apprenticeships or internships in a desired field, such as technology, marketing, and business, are often advertised at the campus career services office. Recruiters who advertise jobs and internships with career services typically have a pre-existing relationship with the office, which can be an advantage to college job seekers because of that rapport. Many campus career centers allow students to register for online alerts for posted positions, workshops, and campus job fairs.

Create a flawless cover letter or resume

Before applying for an internship or job, students should create detailed, flawless cover letters and resumes. These documents are an introduction to potential employers, who critique the applicants’ experience, soft skills, and specialized skills before deciding if they even want to bring candidates in for interviews.

Recruiters typically spend less than a minute to peruse a cover letter or resume, so it is important to structure your cover letter and resume, list only relevant information, and proofread everything. Structuring your cover letter or resume covers everything from ensuring your documents are the appropriate length to layout and font.

Visit specialized career sites for jobs

The cover letter expresses the candidate’s interest in a position. It also details a few highlights that complement the position for which a college job seeker is applying, and lists specialized skills, such as web design, HTML code, certifications, and foreign language proficiency. It should also include the person who recommended that the job seeker apply for the position, if applicable.

A college student’s resume should be one page – the average person does not have enough relevant job experience to justify a two-page curriculum vitae.  Highlight the principal tasks (primary work responsibilities) for each job or internship. Do not use informal fonts and large pitch for your resume. Stick to fonts like Times New Roman or Arial in 12 pitch. Ask a trusted friend, parent, or mentor to proofread your cover letter and resume before submitting it – errors will almost guarantee that a potential employer will not call you for an interview.

Finally, be sure to follow applicant instructions the company lists. If candidates are asked not to call the company about the position, respect the recruiter’s process. If candidates are allowed to call the prospective employer, only ask questions that are not covered in the position announcement. For example, if the job announcement states that travel is required, do not ask (before or during the interview) if traveling is expected.

Next week: Part II of the Workplace Primer for College Students

© Copyright 2012 Ask The Strategist™

 

DISCLAIMER: ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that addresses business, career, workplace and etiquette issues. Any advice dispensed by Ask The Strategist is purely for informational and entertainment purposes. Take the advice and opinions at your own risk – and betterment! Follow @KesiStribling or @CareerConnectDC on Twitter. Send questions, your conundrums, or questions via video to ask@ksgsc.com. All submissions become the property of Ask The Strategist. Names and other identifying information may be changed to protect the person asking for advice.

 

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• Sunday, July 08th, 2012

Article Excerpt: The Washington Post hosts July job fairs

 

Washington Post hosts job fairs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Washington Post will host two career fairs during the month of July in the Greater Washington, DC region for job seekers in targeted industries. For minimum requirements, or to pre-register and post your resume, visit the Washington Post job fairs home. Job seekers are asked to bring copies of their resumes to the fair.

Some of the featured participating employers include BioReliance, Community Connections, and Contact 1 Inc.

Read the entire article

Read more DC Workplace articles on Examiner.com

 

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• Tuesday, May 01st, 2012

EVENT: Presented by STEM Connector

http://www.stemconnector.org/resources-events


Townhall Conference Call
Workforce Planning to Fill the STEM Jobs Pipeline
May 2, 2012 – 2PM EST

Click here to register
Cookies must be enabled on your browser.

 

Current Speakers Include: 

 

Governor Jack Markell, Delaware Governor Jack Markell, DelawareAs Governor of Delaware, Jack Markell has helped open shuttered manufacturing facilities, won President Obama’s Race to the Top competition for progress in public school reform, and signed new laws to drive improvements in the economy, environment, and education. Governor Markell brings innovative public and private sector experience to the Office of Governor. He began his career in the private sector helping lead the wireless technology revolution as the 13th employee at Nextel (a name he coined), where he served as Senior Vice President for Corporate Development. Governor Markell is the current Vice-Chair of the National Governors Association.
Marc Morial Marc Morial, President and CEO, National Urban LeagueEntrepreneur. Lawyer. Professor. Legislator. Mayor. President, U.S. Conference of Mayors. CEO of the National Urban League, the nation’s largest civil rights organization. In a distinguished professional career that has spanned 25 years, Marc Morial has performed all of these roles with excellence, and is one of the most accomplished servant-leaders in the nation. He served as Mayor of New Orleans from 1994 to 2002.
Hank Jackson Hank Jackson, President and CEO, Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM)Henry G. (Hank) Jackson is the president and CEO for the Society for Human Resource Management, the world’s largest association devoted to the human resource profession. Prior to this he served as the Society’s interim president and CEO, and before that he was Chief Global Finance and Business Affairs Officer. In this capacity he was responsible for financial management as well as publications and new media, meetings and conferences, seminars, member marketing, corporate sales and technology solutions.
Rick Stephens Rick Stephens, Senior VP, Human Resources, BoeingRichard (Rick) Stephens is senior vice president, Human Resources and Administration for The Boeing Company, and member of the Boeing Executive Council.
Stephens, a 31-year Boeing veteran, oversees all leadership development, training, employee relations, compensation, benefits, Global Corporate Citizenship, and diversity initiatives at the Chicago-based aerospace company.
Gary Wimberly Gary Wimberly, Senior Vice President & Chief Information Officer, Express ScriptsGary Wimberly came to Express Scripts in 2004 and has held numerous top management positions. As senior vice president and chief information officer, his focus is on the overall IT strategy and performance, specifically focusing on innovative solutions, process improvements and improving productivity. Wimberly is responsible for ensuring the information systems are aligned with the business strategies of Express Scripts.
Jeri L. Buchholz Jeri L. Buchholz, Assistant Administrator for Human Capital Management, NASAAs the Assistant Administrator for Human Capital Management and NASA’s Chief Human Capital Officer, Jeri Buchholz has stewardship responsibility for NASA’s workforce. Her responsibilities include setting the agency’s workforce development strategy, assessing workforce characteristics and future needs based on the agency’s mission and strategic plan; aligning the agency’s human resources policies and programs with organizational mission, strategic goals, and performance outcomes.
Linda Cureton Linda Y. Cureton, Chief Information Officer, NASALinda Y. Cureton is the Chief Information Officer (CIO) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). As NASA CIO, she provides the requisite leadership to transform the management of information technology (IT) capabilities and services to support and enable NASA’s mission. She ensures that the Agency’s information resource management (IRM) strategy is in alignment with NASA’s vision, mission, and strategic goals.
Leland Melvin Leland Melvin, Associate Administrator for Education, NASAMr. Melvin has served the Astronaut Office Space Station Operations Branch, the Education Department at NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C, and the Robotics Branch of the Astronaut Office. As co-manager of NASA’s Educator Astronaut Program, Leland Melvin traveled across the country, engaging thousands of students and teachers in the excitement of space exploration, and inspiring them to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. A veteran of two space flights, STS-122 in 2008, and STS-129 in 2009, Leland Melvin has logged over 565 hours in space.
Martin Scaglione Martin Scaglione, President, ACT Workforce DivisionOver the past five years, ACT has witnessed widespread adoption of its Workforce Development programs, including the globally recognized WorkKeys System and the National Career Readiness Certificate. In his pursuit of ACT’s mission to help people achieve education and workplace success, Martin has called on his extensive experience in business and industry. Martin began his career with Maytag, where he worked for nearly 20 years. He then led the North American Bosch-Siemens Household (BSH) appliance group in a variety of roles including chief operating officer.
V. Celeste Carter V. Celeste Carter, Program Director, NSF – ATEV. Celeste Carter received her Ph.D. in Microbiology from the Pennsylvania State University School of Medicine in 1982 under the direction of Dr. Satvir S. Tevethia. She served as a Program Director twice in the Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) as a rotator. Dr. Carter accepted a permanent Program Director position in DUE in 2009; she is the Lead Program Director for the Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Program in DUE as well as working on other programs in the Division and across the Foundation.
Brian Fitzgerald Brian Fitzgerald, CEO, Higher Education Forum (BHEF)Brian K. Fitzgerald is a leading analyst and advocate for higher education and science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Dr. Fitzgerald serves as BHEF’s chief executive officer and has led the organization to develop an ambitious policy and programmatic agenda focused on college readiness, access, and success, particularly in high-need disciplines such as science and math. Under Dr. Fitzgerald’s leadership, both of BHEF’s key initiatives—Securing America’s Leadership in STEM in partnership with Raytheon Company and the College Readiness, Access and Success Initiative (CRI): An Agenda for Educational Success—have grown as signatures of the organization.

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• Tuesday, January 24th, 2012

Nominations now open for Employee of the Month

Shout out the hardest workers in the DMV!

More than 711,000 employees make Washington, DC run efficiently, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Add the surrounding counties in Maryland and Virginia, and the number grows to more than 1,000,000 people who drive business, revenue, and services in, and around, the nation’s capital. We seek to sing the praises of many of these hardworking and talented employees in our new article series, Employee of the Month on Examiner.com.

In order to make Employee of the Month a success, your nominations – and spreading the word about the friendly competition – are vital.

Submission Process and Guidelines

Anyone may submit a nomination for consideration for Employee of the Month, including those who wish to self-nominate. Eligibility is based on two criteria:

1. The nominated employee works in the metropolitan Washington, DC area (i.e. the District of Columbia, Northern Virginia – Fairfax County, Prince William County; Montgomery County, MD; Prince George’s County; Howard County, MD)

2.  The nominee must work for a company, nonprofit organization, federal/local government, or educational institution; be support staff, a manager, executive director, administrator, intern, or anyone who works there; and, be a part-time or full-time employee of the company

Winners are selected based upon how well the nominator documents the employee’s contributions to the workplace. Nominations should be sent in Microsoft Word, and contain no more than three paragraphs. Include the nominator’s AND nominee’s name, telephone number, and email address.

Tips for writing a successful nomination:

  • Include specific contributions to the workplace
  • Indicate nominee’s work title and employer
  • Specify why the nominee should be selected asEmployee of the Month

Employee of the Month Submissions

Email nominations to eotm@ksgsc.com. Winners will be featured in an upcoming article on Examiner.com.

For complete details and submission guidelines, visit www.ksgsc.com/eotm. Follow us on Twitter @KesiStribling or @CareerConnectDC.

This story also appears on Examiner.com.

 

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