Tag-Archive for ◊ careers ◊

• Monday, December 16th, 2013

Five Valuable Lessons Entrepreneurs Can Learn from Beyoncé

Beyoncé's surprise CD release holds 5 valuable lessons for entrepreneurs. Photo Credit: Invision for Parkwood Entertainment

Whether or not you like Beyoncé or her music, she has proven, yet again, that she is at the top of her game and a stellar marketing magnate.  The singer stunned music industry insiders and her fans alike with her surprise fifth studio CD release with no fanfare last Friday, and in the process, has taught entrepreneurs five valuable lessons they can employ, whether they run empires, or are just getting started. The singer’s self-titled compilation enjoyed the highest sales of a debut on iTunes in the company’s history, with more than 600,000 units sold within three days of the release.

Innovation is key

Mrs. Carter has shown us how innovation – approaching situations, projects, and challenges with a fresh eye and a bit of creativity – can help unleash ideas
that, if they are good ones implemented at the right time, can propel businesses and brands to the next level of success, or awareness.

Being stagnant is no fun for those in charge of running a business. Ideas don’t flow, and frustration ensues. What we can learn from Beyoncé in her evolutionary approach to her career is that innovation never goes stale, no matter how established you are in your industry.

Know and Respect Your Brand

If you followed comments in the Twitterverse about Beyoncé’s CD release, many people – including her colleagues in entertainment – opined that she is the only established artist who could take such a nontraditional, yet aggressive, risk and succeed.

A huge part of the decision to use iTunes as the conduit for her new music, I assume, was greatly influenced by Beyoncé knowing and respecting her own brand. When you know that your product or service is one that appeals to your target audience, and your brand is appealing to your followers, customers, or constituency, it gives you latitude to explore creative ways to share new products or services. As the adage goes, confidence is key. If you are confident about your brand, others will often take you
seriously, even if your company is relatively unknown.

Risk Can Be Gratifying

Most of us are averse to extreme risk in growing or expanding business opportunities, or in some cases, decrease or redefine products or services offered. Taking a risk, after all, can mean lost revenue, staff reduction, or unfavorable feedback from customers or strategic alliances. As in financial investment, a certain level of risk is a necessary element in eventually reaping a big reward.

Even for an established artist like Beyoncé, a surprise CD release in a unique format was a very risky move, but she  has proven that taking chances, research, preparation, and a stellar work ethic combined are the hallmarks of a successful entrepreneur. Whether or not the the end result is a roaring success, such as getting your product in a store that typically wouldn’t carry it, or launching a social media campaign that nets thousands of loyal customers, risk can help reduce the fear that keeps business owners and company decision-makers from evolving.

Plus, taking a risk and assessing its impact can be helpful in determining if timing, resources, or staffing influenced the outcome. Then, use that data to
retool the risk and try again, hopefully, with more success if it doesn’t go according to plan the first time.

Don’t Be Consumed By Public Opinion

In an age where people can berate you on social media, it takes a tough person to ignore the comments, harsh criticism, and opinions and get on with it. Without uttering a word, Beyoncé has let the recording industry and the world know that she is not consumed by what critics, or even her own record label, think of her music, and ultimately, the songstress’ strategy for how she wanted to distribute her music.

Great ideas or novel concepts aren’t always understood or appreciated, even though our guts, research, or soft promotions have told us otherwise. Hearing objections to our ideas, or being criticized because the time isn’t right, people don’t get the concept, or the idea has never been done before by the company, can influence our courage to boldly make the move anyway.

Feedback is essential from customers, strategic alliances, and collaborators; however, if harsh criticism is the sole consideration in deciding whether or not to move forward with an idea, you may need to ignore the contrarians and implement it anyway. Who knows? It could be the next Facebook, Amazon.com, or Trader Joe’s.

 

Keep Your Mouth Shut

I can only imagine how hard it was for Beyoncé to keep this historic entertainment move a secret. Confidentiality agreements aside, this is probably my favorite lesson from the songstress.

How many entrepreneurs have had ideas hijacked by people because they talked too much about their plans before all of the details were
in place and established in a way that no other person could lay claim to the concept?

While Beyoncé may not have worried about competition as the primary reason for keeping mum about the visual concept CD, great ideas
implemented at the right time can mean a financial bonanza, or priceless media coverage. She will undoubtedly enjoy both as the momentum continues.

I am sure that other entertainers are taking notes and learning from Beyoncé’s innovative and creative approach to her career, which may
influence how digital music as a primary CD release platform is used in the future. Ultimately, Beyoncé’s fearless – and lucrative – move is a lesson for
all business owners to take notice of and create their own unique ways of promoting their brand, services, and products.

 

DISCLAIMER: ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that highlights information on business, entrepreneurship, careers and the workplace, health, community, and women’s issues. Any content or advice dispensed through Ask The Strategist is solely for informational and entertainment purposes. All content is the property of Ask The Strategist and affiliated companies unless otherwise noted. We occasionally address questions from our readers and subscribers in posts. Send your question or conundrum  via video or regular email to ask@ksgsc.com. All submissions become the property of Ask The Strategist. Names and other identifying information may be changed to protect the person asking for advice.

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• Friday, December 06th, 2013
Sneak Peek: Super Soul Sunday with Oprah Winfrey and Howard Schultz

Ask The Strategist has been given an exclusive preview of Oprah  Winfrey’s interview with Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz on Super Soul Sunday, which airs this Sunday, December 8, 2013 at 11 a.m. ET on OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network. Winfrey sits down with Schultz, who shares the story of his inspiring rise from the housing projects in Brooklyn, New York, to his current role as a successful entrepreneur, global thought leader, and innovator.

Schultz will share the leadership lessons he’s learned while guiding this iconic brand for more than three decades, discussing how an emphasis on ethics, authenticity and a people-before-profit philosophy helped to grow and sustain his multi-billion dollar company.

Reflecting on his #1 New York Times bestseller, “Onward: How Starbucks Fought for Its Life Without Losing Its Soul,” Schultz recounts the story behind the global coffee company’s comeback in 2008, when he decided to return as the CEO to help restore Starbucks’ core values and mission to inspire and nurture the human spirit – “one person, one cup, and one neighborhood at a time.”

 

Oprah Winfrey with Howard Schultz. Photo Credit © Harpo Studios, Inc./George Burns

Following are three excerpts and video clips of Oprah Winfrey’s interview with Howard Schultz on Super Soul Sunday on OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network.

EXCERPT: One of Howard’s Principles: “Don’t Be Threatened By People Smarter Than You”

OPRAH: And I know that you’re guided by your own values and your own set of principles.  There are four that you talk about that I love: Don’t be threatened by people smarter than you. Can you speak to that?

HOWARD: You can’t build any kind of organization if you’re not gonna surround yourself with people who have experience and skill base beyond your own.  Only as if those people have like-minded values.

OPRAH: That is the key to starting anything.

HOWARD: That’s the key.  And I think when you discover perhaps that these people do not have those values, then you have to have a very quick conversation.  And if they don’t demonstrate that kind of behavior, not everyone deserves to be on the team.

OPRAH: Compromise anything but your core values.  That’s what you say.

HOWARD: Short-term success is not going to build long-term value for anyone.  And we live in an age where everything is based on the short term.  And I think what we’re trying to do and what we’ve demonstrated is very –

OPRAH: You had to fight that in your own culture.

HOWARD: We did.

OPRAH: Yeah.

HOWARD: It’s hard to do.

View the video: “Don’t Be Threatened by People Smarter Than You”

EXCERPT: Howard on the Importance of a Leader to be Vulnerable

OPRAH: You say it’s important as a leader –

HOWARD: To be vulnerable.

OPRAH: — to be vulnerable. Where’d you learn that?

HOWARD: Well, when I stood up in front of people and I — I apologized and started crying that first week.

OPRAH: Which is not what CEO’s do.

HOWARD: Especially men. I think we’re taught as men to — you know, but I think vulnerability is transparency.  And what I said earlier is I think the currency of leadership is transparency and you’ve got to be truthful. So I don’t think it’s — I don’t think you should be vulnerable every day.

OPRAH: Right.

HOWARD: But there are moments where you’ve got to share your soul and your conscience with people and show them who you are and not be afraid of it.

View the video: The Importance of a Leader to be Vulnerable

EXCERPT:  Howard finding Starbucks at a “Spiritual Crisis” Upon His Return to the Company in 2008

OPRAH: Would you say that Starbucks was in a spiritual crisis?

HOWARD: Yes, I would.

OPRAH: Mm-hmm.

HOWARD: And I would say that — I would also say that most of the problems we had were self-induced mistakes.  And I stood in front of the entire employee base of the company, our partners, and said — apologized for, as leaders, that we had let them and their families down.  But we were gonna return the company back to its glory days.

OPRAH: Okay.  So in those days where you knew the company — the company had lost its way –

HOWARD: Yes.

OPRAH: – was in its own spiritual crisis, did you debate whether or not you should jump back in or not?  I know — I know –

HOWARD: First of all, I never planned to come back to Starbucks.  But, again, this is about love.

OPRAH: Because you’d stepped down at CEO.

HOWARD: I did.  This is about love.  This is about passion.  This is about responsibility.  And it’s about leadership.  And there was no second thought whatsoever.  I came back to lead the company back.  But I also needed help from others. And I needed people to believe.  And we started doing things that were quite unorthodox, uncharacteristic of a company that was in trouble, especially during the financial crisis.

View the video: Starbucks Spiritual Crisis

Find OWN in your area

For more information about Super Soul Saturday, visit:

http://www.oprah.com/own-super-soul-sunday/super-soul-sunday.html

DISCLAIMER: ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that highlights information on business, entrepreneurship, careers and the workplace, health, community, and women’s issues. Any content or advice dispensed through Ask The Strategist is solely for informational and entertainment purposes. All content is the property of Ask The Strategist and affiliated companies unless otherwise noted. We occasionally address questions from our readers and subscribers in posts. Send your question or conundrum  via video or regular email to ask@ksgsc.com. All submissions become the property of Ask The Strategist. Names and other identifying information may be changed to protect the person asking for advice.

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• Monday, November 04th, 2013

The Strategy Sessions kicks off new season, celebrates National Career Development Month with the Public Leadership Education Network on Tuesday, November 5, 2013

The new season begins on November 5, 2013

November 5, 2013 marks the new season of The Strategy Sessions radio show. To mark the occasion, we are unveiling our new branding, including the new LIVE CHAT feature on the show page, show logo, and the new Facebook page (www.facebook.com/thestrategysessions).

 

During November, we are celebrating National Career Development Month. On the first show  of the new season, we welcome Dawn Culpepper, Director of Programs and Operations for the Public Education Leadership Network (PLEN) in Washington, DC. Ms. Culpepper will shed light on how the organization prepares young women for careers in elected office, advocacy, and in communities across the country. She will also discuss how today’s women leaders have tough issues to tackle – including the recent government shutdown and consensus building – and the organization’s upcoming event, Women, Law, and Legal Advocacy Seminar featuring keynote speaker, Heather Podesta.

We encourage listeners to call in or email us with questions about PLEN, women in leadership roles, challenges women in the workplace confront, or career development for young women.

The Strategy Sessions: Tuesday, November 5, 2013
11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. ET
www.blogtalkradio.com/thestrategysessions
(Listen LIVE or on-demand after the show)

Call in during the show: (347) 539-5143
Email your question or comment: talkback@ksgsc.com
LIVE chat: www.blogtalkradio.com/thestrategysesssions
Like us/post questions on Facebook: www.facebook.com/thestrategysessions
Twitter: #TheStrategySessions

 

Dawn Culpepper, PLEN

Dawn Culpepper is the Director of Programs and Operations for the Public Leadership Education Network (PLEN), the only national organization with the sole focus of preparing college women for careers in public policy. Based in Washington, D.C, Dawn is responsible for the strategic development and implementation of leadership in public policy programs and recruitment of college women nationwide.

She was formerly an AmeriCorps *VISTA Fellow at Turning the Page, a Washington, D.C. educational nonprofit aimed at increasing parental involvement in public schools. Dawn’s responsibilities at Turning the Page included designing and implementing leadership curriculum; working with government officials, school administration/staff, and parent leaders; and overseeing grant implementation for a school-wide health and wellness program.  She also worked at Appleseed, a nonprofit network of 17 public interest justice centers, where she oversaw more than 300 pro bono legal volunteers from top firms across the national capital region.

Dawn graduated with distinction from the University of Virginia in 2010 with a BA in Government. She focused her studies primarily on gender and the political process. Dawn was involved with both the Women’s Center and the Young Women Leaders Program throughout her college career.

 

CONNECT WITH PLEN

Website: www.plen.org
Phone: (202) 872-1585
Twitter: @PLENNetwork

Our Sponsor

This episode is sponsored by E.G. Educational Services, LLC. The company provides one-on-one tutoring services to youth and adults in the Greater Philadelphia, PA area. They believe that quality tutoring at an affordable price is the equation for success. Visit www.egeducationalservices.com for more information or to schedule a tutoring session.

About The Strategy Sessions radio show

Now in it’s fourth  year on the Blog Talk Radio network, The Strategy Sessions radio show features industry leaders and strategists on business, careers, travel, health, women’s issues, youth, and more. Airing live on the first and third Tuesdays of the month at 11:00 a.m. ET, The Strategy Sessions has featured luminaries representing corporations, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations such as the U.S. Small Business Administration; Internships.com; AAA; American Express; Women Impacting Public Policy; LifeLock; Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship; Aetna; the American Heart Association; and, Lockheed Martin. For more information, listen online, or to download the podcast, visit www.blogtalkradio.com/thestrategysessions. If you have a show idea, or would like to be a guest or show sponsor, email talkback@ksgsc.com, or like us on Facebook (www.facebook.com/thestrategysessions). Twitter hashtag #TheStrategySessions

Related reading:

It’s National Career Development Month

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• Friday, April 12th, 2013

 

The Power of No

Last week, Dr. Oz had a physician, Dr. Sue Varma, on his show who detailed the health challenges that befall certain personality types (What does your personality reveal about your health?). For example, Type C folks often bottle up their feelings, and potentially shave years off their lives because they refuse to say no to others because they want to please them. Saying yes to people or situations that warrant a “no,” can also have an impact beyond health.

I am an unabashed optimist who believes in embracing opportunity, which usually comes from saying yes to something: a last-minute speaking engagement, guest blog post, or a chance to submit an article. The problem is that we sometimes say yes to others, when we would gain more power (personal and professional) from just saying no.

Recently, I had two opportunities, one professional and the other personal, presented to me. Let me address the work-related one, which would have allowed me to practice my professional strengths. There is no doubt that I would have enjoyed my work. I ultimately decided not to pursue the opportunity because my intuition signaled that it would interfere with other professional opportunities that may have presented themselves after committing to the engagement.  Making the decision to decline was initially a hard one, but one that I did not regret because another, better opportunity came along one week later.

I am not suggesting that you turn down opportunities, willy-nilly, that could potentially lead to great experiences.

The point of the Power of No is that when we take time to think decisions through thoroughly, peacefully, and with a sense of clarity, we sometimes realize that saying yes to something that we should really decline could interfere with better opportunities that are more beneficial for us.

That’s the Power of No.

 

DISCLAIMER: ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that highlights information on business, entrepreneurship, careers and the workplace, health, community, and women’s issues. Any content or advice dispensed through Ask The Strategist is solely for informational and entertainment purposes. All content is the property of Ask The Strategist and affiliated companies unless otherwise noted, and may not be reproduced without express written permission from the author(s).

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• Monday, September 03rd, 2012

 

September is Wealth & Wellness Month

30 ways to improve your wealth and wellness

Initially, we declared September 2012 Wealth & Wellness month in honor of our upcoming summit for college students to help them develop positive strategies for creating optimal wealth (career planning, exploring entrepreneurship, and reducing debt) and health (stress reduction, positive emotional health, and healthy relationships); however, I’ve decided to issue a clarion call to adults and students, alike, to use September to actively reflect upon and take action to improve access to wealth and healthy living.
So, here’s a list of 30 things you can do each day during Wealth & Wellness month in September:

1. Swap out one sugary food for a healthy one during breakfast, lunch, dinner, or snack time

2. Make an appointment for a dental cleaning

3. Organize a girlfriends (or guys!) group walk, hike, yoga, or Dance Trance class

4. Pack a homemade picnic and invite your beloved to dine with you

5. Go stargazing with a friend or spouse

6. Update your resume and ask a mentor or friend to review it

7. Open a savings account

8. Make an appointment for a pedicure or manicure

9. Have your blood pressure checked

10. Join a support group if you have lost a loved one recently

11. Introduce your child to a new vegetable (roasted carrots and red bell pepper are healthy, sweet, and delicious)
12. Engage a mentor to help you build a business

13. Pay off a credit card (start with the one with the lowest balance)

14. Talk to your child, Godchild, or young family members about money

15. Donate gently worn professional attire to Dress for Success

16. Talk to an experienced, licensed financial planner about investing in stocks, Roth IRAs, or CDs

17. Draft a will or living will

18. Get a mammogram

19. Tell your loved ones you love them

20. Eat dinner with the family, at the table, and not in front of the television

21. Disengage social media for 1 day

22. Donate your time or money to a worthy cause

23. Make an appointment to have your hearing or vision tested

24. Spend quality time with your pet(s)

25. Do 1 good thing for 1 person today

26. Try a vegetarian meal

27. Put on sunscreen – use an appropriate SPF

28. Substitute your drink full of spirits with a non-alcoholic option

29. Take an elderly parent or neighbor to the doctor

30. Tell someone else about Wealth & Wellness month. Better yet, share this list with others.

How have you celebrated Wealth & Wellness month? Let us know if any of these suggestions worked for you or your family, by emailing us, or comment below.

 

DISCLAIMER: ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that addresses business, career, workplace and etiquette issues. Any advice dispensed by Ask The Strategist is purely for informational and entertainment purposes. Take the advice and opinions at your own risk – and betterment! Follow @KesiStribling or @CareerConnectDC on Twitter. Post your questions/email your conundrum/send your question via video to ask@ksgsc.com. All submissions become the property of Ask The Strategist. Names and other identifying information may be changed to protect the person asking for advice.

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• Tuesday, August 28th, 2012

 

Workplace Primer for College Students (part II)

In part I of the Workplace Primer for College Students, we detailed the importance of tailoring the job search and preparing a flawless cover letter or resume. Part II focuses on the interview, specifically what collegiate job seekers should do before, during, and after the meeting with prospective employers.

Prepare for the interview

You're hired! Interview preparation can score big points for your career.

Your cover letter and resume have passed muster and the company you eagerly want to work for has contacted you for an interview. There are several tips to help you prepare for the face-to-face meeting (or telephone screening, as is the trend these days). From selecting an appropriate wardrobe to asking a potential employer the right questions, interview preparation requires a lot of thought – and action.

Look the part: It is essential to select appropriate attire for the interview; and, the accessories that make the outfit, which complete your overall appearance. Ultimately, the interview wardrobe should be professional, and make you blend in, rather than stand out, from the company employees. The reality is that companies want new employees who reflect the current corporate culture, and that includes attire.

Men should wear slacks, a crisp shirt, and matching blazer. Of course, the tie completes the look – not a clip on! Freshly shined shoes and simple accoutrements, such as a watch, sans bling, and conservative cuff links complete the professional look. Interviewees can look stylish, no matter the budget constraints.

Related: professional attire for men

Women do not have to sacrifice style when preparing for the interview.  A modest length and well-fitting (not too tight) skirt or dress is appropriate, with a conservative shirt and blazer. If suiting seems a bit boring, or if the industry has a more relaxed approach to dressing in the workplace, it is okay to pair trousers or a skirt with a cardigan set. Moderate heels or sling backs should be clean and not scuffed. Understated jewelry rounds out the interview outfit.

Related: professional attire for women

Even if the industry usually calls for khakis in the workplace (think technology), you can wear the corporate style once you land the job. For your interview, avoid the casual Friday look.

Women's professional attire on our pinterest page

Research the audience: Knowing one’s audience is imperative. Conduct research about the company in advance, including reviewing the corporate website, Facebook fan page, and Twitter account. Being armed with information about the company helps during the interview. Potential employers will appreciate the initiative, and will view the well-informed candidate as one who possesses a can-do attitude.

Before the interview, practice responses to potential questions that may be asked. Ask a trusted mentor, friend, or family member to conduct a mock interview, and assess your performance. Pay particular attention to the use of fillers when responding to questions  (um, ah, and you know), so that you can avoid them. Record the mock interview, and look at it a few times to improve your delivery. Doing so will help nervous candidates  ace the interview by being ready to talk about tasks undertaken in the current job, or skill sets and special talents that can translate to the job being applied for at the company.

Arrive early for the interview: One of the most important aspects of the interview is arriving on time to the meeting. Even if you’re familiar with the geographic area of the company, identify a preferred and alternate route to get to the interview. If there is an accident, detour, or water main break, taking an alternate route may be the difference between getting to the interview on time, or missing out on the opportunity by being an hour late. Drive to the location, if possible, the same day of the week and time the interview is scheduled, beforehand.

Professional attire for men on our pinterest page

Arrive early (not more than 30 minutes ahead of time), or on time, but never late. Companies often ask candidates to complete applications prior to the interview. Remember, the interview actually begins as soon as you arrive at the location. Be pleasant when speaking to or interacting with anyone in the office. Do not be haughty, put off, overly friendly, or flirt with the staff. By the way, waiting patiently until called in for the interview means no texting, listening to your iPod, or talking on your cell phone with or without your Bluetooth.

Ask the right questions: Be sure to ask at least one question during the interview. It should be one that is of genuine interest and not something that the interviewer has already covered. After the meeting is over, send a thank you note. Conventional thought is that a handwritten note to the interviewer is the way to go, it is also okay to send a brief, error free email thank you note.

Once the company has offered you the job, there are a number of questions to ask, not just those related to salary. Detailed questions include those related to annual and sick leave, retirement contributions by the employer, corporate culture, employee expectations, and other details about the position that may not have come up during the interview (i.e. the position’s funding is contingent upon grant money received).

 

Next: Part III (final) of the Workplace Primer for College Students

© Copyright 2012 Ask The Strategist™

 

DISCLAIMER: ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that addresses business, career, workplace and etiquette issues. Any advice dispensed by Ask The Strategist is purely for informational and entertainment purposes. Take the advice and opinions at your own risk – and betterment! Follow @KesiStribling or @CareerConnectDC on Twitter. Post your questions/email your conundrum/send your question via video to ask@ksgsc.com. All submissions become the property of Ask The Strategist. Names and other identifying information may be changed to protect the person asking for advice.

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• Sunday, August 12th, 2012

 

Workplace Primer for College Students (Part I of III)

Begin your career the right way!

This week, thousands of students will enter the hallowed halls of colleges across the country. For many, once the excitement of moving into dorms and registering for the requisite classes has subsided, collegians will settle into pursuing job opportunities. Whether a necessity, or a means for generating work experience for their resumes, entering the workforce – from searching for jobs to the on-boarding experience – can be a daunting task for rookie employees.

For college students, there are some key imperatives to help them become successful job seekers:  streamline the job search; create a flawless cover letter and resume; prepare for the interview; ask the right questions before you accept the position; give an award-winning performance at work; and, treasure your mentors and advocates.

 

 

Streamline the job search

Applying for any-old-job is a strategy that can lead to a disappointing workplace experience. Streamlining the job search is the first step in gaining temporary or long-term employment. Job seekers typically visit online job sites first to find opportunities. In addition to surfing popular sites, such as DCJobs.com or Career Builder, there are a number of websites tailored to specific industries. For example, CareerMD is an online career source for physicians and residents looking for jobs in the health care industry. The American Marketing Association job site lists thousands of opportunities in marketing and communications. Another site, the American Institute of Architects, lists architecture opportunities spanning internships to project managers.

Paid jobs, apprenticeships or internships in a desired field, such as technology, marketing, and business, are often advertised at the campus career services office. Recruiters who advertise jobs and internships with career services typically have a pre-existing relationship with the office, which can be an advantage to college job seekers because of that rapport. Many campus career centers allow students to register for online alerts for posted positions, workshops, and campus job fairs.

Create a flawless cover letter or resume

Before applying for an internship or job, students should create detailed, flawless cover letters and resumes. These documents are an introduction to potential employers, who critique the applicants’ experience, soft skills, and specialized skills before deciding if they even want to bring candidates in for interviews.

Recruiters typically spend less than a minute to peruse a cover letter or resume, so it is important to structure your cover letter and resume, list only relevant information, and proofread everything. Structuring your cover letter or resume covers everything from ensuring your documents are the appropriate length to layout and font.

Visit specialized career sites for jobs

The cover letter expresses the candidate’s interest in a position. It also details a few highlights that complement the position for which a college job seeker is applying, and lists specialized skills, such as web design, HTML code, certifications, and foreign language proficiency. It should also include the person who recommended that the job seeker apply for the position, if applicable.

A college student’s resume should be one page – the average person does not have enough relevant job experience to justify a two-page curriculum vitae.  Highlight the principal tasks (primary work responsibilities) for each job or internship. Do not use informal fonts and large pitch for your resume. Stick to fonts like Times New Roman or Arial in 12 pitch. Ask a trusted friend, parent, or mentor to proofread your cover letter and resume before submitting it – errors will almost guarantee that a potential employer will not call you for an interview.

Finally, be sure to follow applicant instructions the company lists. If candidates are asked not to call the company about the position, respect the recruiter’s process. If candidates are allowed to call the prospective employer, only ask questions that are not covered in the position announcement. For example, if the job announcement states that travel is required, do not ask (before or during the interview) if traveling is expected.

Next week: Part II of the Workplace Primer for College Students

© Copyright 2012 Ask The Strategist™

 

DISCLAIMER: ASK THE STRATEGIST is a blog that addresses business, career, workplace and etiquette issues. Any advice dispensed by Ask The Strategist is purely for informational and entertainment purposes. Take the advice and opinions at your own risk – and betterment! Follow @KesiStribling or @CareerConnectDC on Twitter. Send questions, your conundrums, or questions via video to ask@ksgsc.com. All submissions become the property of Ask The Strategist. Names and other identifying information may be changed to protect the person asking for advice.

 

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• Sunday, July 08th, 2012

Article Excerpt: The Washington Post hosts July job fairs

 

Washington Post hosts job fairs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Washington Post will host two career fairs during the month of July in the Greater Washington, DC region for job seekers in targeted industries. For minimum requirements, or to pre-register and post your resume, visit the Washington Post job fairs home. Job seekers are asked to bring copies of their resumes to the fair.

Some of the featured participating employers include BioReliance, Community Connections, and Contact 1 Inc.

Read the entire article

Read more DC Workplace articles on Examiner.com

 

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• Wednesday, November 30th, 2011

It’s National Career Development Month

It's National Career Development Month

Today, November 30, 2011, is the last day of National Career Development Awareness Month.

In an effort to encourage young people and adults to take charge of their professional careers, the month was chock full of activities, including a poetry and poster contest, My Career Dreams, sponsored by the National Career Development Association.

Why celebrate career development awareness only in November? I exhort you – job seekers and those who are content with their careers – to use this month as a kick off for becoming, and staying, empowered about your choices for your career. Following are 10 things you can do to boost your career:

 Talk to your mentor about your career pursuits and advice
 Review job announcements for positions in which you are interested
 Visit your college Career Services office (students and alumni, alike)
 Begin developing your career plan
 Apply for an internship or volunteer
 Shadow an employee at work
 Take a continuing education class
 Get a certificate in an area of interest
 Update your resume
 Overhaul your social media sites to make sure they are professional

For more resources and tips to strengthen your career, visit our Career Connect website. Did these tips help you? Do you have a tip for us? Let ASK THE STRATEGIST KNOW by commenting below.

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• Friday, August 05th, 2011

The National Urban League hosts online chat about jobs and the economy

National Urban League talks jobs, economic future

Today, the National Urban League’s Policy Institute in Washington, DC, will host an online chat about the unemployment rate and  jobs. Led by Dr. Valerie Rawlston Wilson, an economist at the policy institute, the chat will focus on three primary areas:

July 2011 unemployment statistics

The National Urban League report At Risk: State of the Black Middle Class

  • Impact of the debt ceiling agreement reached earlier this week

The online chat will be held today, Friday, August 5, 2011, 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. EST.

REGISTER for the online chat: http://www.iamempowered.com.

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